Grave danger for Obesity and Diabetes from "Trace" compounds you don't know you are consuming

 Plastic bottles are lined with BPA. BPA is metabolized in the body to Glucuronide. Glucuronide massively disrupts the endocrine and causes insulin resistance and elevated levels of insulin.

Plastic bottles are lined with BPA. BPA is metabolized in the body to Glucuronide. Glucuronide massively disrupts the endocrine and causes insulin resistance and elevated levels of insulin.

I have been explaining that obesity and diabetes cannot be accounted for by the “calories-in:calories-out” model that has been used by the FDA (and most doctors, dieticians & nutritionists) for more than a century. An example I gave in my “Obesity Tutorial” is how a trace element, BPA-Glucuronide, in parts-per-million, massively disrupts the endocrine and causes the liver to produce fat. It can be a major contributor to obesity. BPA-Glucuronide is a metabolite produced in the body by the synthesis of BPA, a chemical found in the lining of cans, plastic dishes and some cheap bottles.

There is a new report by the Endocrine Society which points to a link between BPA (“endocrine-disrupting chemical exposure”) and both diabetes and obesity. The endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) affect beta and alpha cells in the pancreas, fat cells, and liver cells and can lead insulin resistance (Type-2 diabetes) and an abundance of insulin in the body (obesity).

Research has also shown endocrine disruptors affects fertility, hormone-related cancers (such as breast and ovarian cancer), prostate conditions, thyroid disorders, neurological issues, and other disorders. The amount of evidence continues to mount.

What chemicals are endocrine disruptors?

These chemicals are DDT and other pesticides, plasticizers such as bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and flame-retardants. They’re found in everyday products (such as above picture)— including cash register receipts, plastic bottles, metal food cans, food, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. 

Couples planning to have a baby, especially pregnant women, should be especially vigilant against any exposure to EDCs.

Some recommendations

1. Do not heat plastic. Plastics will leach when heated. Avoiding heating plastic containers in the microwave or dishwashers, or filling it with very hot water. Better yet, do not use plastic dishes (sorry plastics industry!).

2. Dump the plastic water bottle. I don’t think I need to say anything more.

3. Rinse your groceries and vegetables. Most pesticides are known EDCs. Rinsing fruits and vegetables with warm water seems sufficient to minimize exposure.

4. Eat fresh food over processed foods. Processed foods may have additives which mimic EDCs. The food is usually packaged in containers that contain BPA. BPA is in the liners to prevent the food from reacting with the metal containers and spoiling. Containers which do not react with foods are expensive and it is a safe bet that most companies do not use them. Avoid meats that come from animals exposed to hormones or antibiotics (good luck!).

5. Store food in BPA-free glass or stainless steel bowls and containers. Manufacturers claim to have removed BPA from food and beverage containers. But they have to have replaced it with something and I don’t know (yet) what “that” thing is and how safe it is (chances are it is not…).

5. Clean your home. Avoid pests in the house. Don’t give them a nook to hide in or scraps to eat. Avoid the need for chemicals and pesticides.

6. Take action. Today chemicals can be added to food containers without any safety testing. Please support me in my crusade to get Congress to mandate testing of chemicals before they are used by the food industry.

 This is an acceptable use of plastic bottles.

This is an acceptable use of plastic bottles.